Get Out Review - Spoiler Free!

     Get Out is quite the appropriate title for this film, it’s been a long time since I sat through a movie that was this entertainingly uncomfortable.  A film this unique could only be described as an oxymoron.  Right from the beginning the film sets the mood of dread and fear, as we get a glimpse of an unsuspecting victim meeting his… well you just have to see the movie.  The movie loves to play with the viewer’s expectations.  While what they show you in the trailer is accurate to what the movie has to offer, there is still so much more to the overall package.  While I was about halfway through the movie, I had no idea what to expect anymore.

     Jordan Peele is a well-established sketch comedy performer best known from the hit show Key and Peele, which he stared alongside with Keegan-Michael Key.  He was also on the cast of MADtv for five seasons, where he served as a writer as well.  When it comes to producing, acting, and writing, Peele seems to be very talented in those fields.  That’s why it shouldn’t come as such a surprise that his directorial debut is a homerun.  At the time this review is posted it will have crossed over eighty-million dollars at the box office, coming off a budget a little over four million.  It’s great to see smart and original horror films making the big “bucks” (pun intended).

                                                                                                 Chris during his terrifying hypnotic state.

                                                                                                 Chris during his terrifying hypnotic state.

     The main character Chris is perfectly portrayed by Daniel Kaluuya, he is an African-American photographer dating a white woman named Rose, played by Allison Williams.  Chris is nervous due to the fact Rose’s parents and brother have no idea she is dating a black man.  She assures him that there is nothing to worry about, but this wouldn’t be a horror film if that were truly the case.  What I found great about this movie was all the hidden cues and gestures that are established.  Some are laid out for foreshadowing while others are there for character development and surprises.  This is a film that challenges you to think for yourself rather than just sit back and throw constant annoying jump scares your way.  The film isn’t only scary in mood, but also in what it represents.  It’s not a shock that racism is a big factor throughout the movie.  What is so intriguing about it is that it’s not conveyed in a way you would expect, it constantly makes you question certain aspects of some characters and their motivations.  I wish I could dive deeper and tell you more but that would only spoil the magic.

     Something else that was fascinating is the music and how they used it.  It may seem familiar to most horror fans at times but it’s not overused at all.  This and other great horror movies the past few years have had excellent scores to compliment the eerie setting.  The movie also has some laugh out loud moments to break up the frightening environment.  Chris’s best friend Rod is the comedy relief here and it pays off hysterically.  What is great about his character is he isn’t wasted on just making you laugh, he has just as an important role to the story as everyone else mainly involved.  I can go on forever about all the small and intelligent jokes and subtle nuances here, but overall this is a fantastic movie and one of the best I’ve seen in a long time.  So far 2017 has been great cinematically, let’s hope it doesn’t stop anytime soon.

      Connor Hesnan

      Connor Hesnan